I am a long term Debian user. I have used Debian since probably the mid 90' up to now. I use latest Debian stable on my personal server or at work, and Ubuntu on my desktop and laptop machines at home. Using it does not mean I am entirely satisfied with it to say the least. I think the distribution is not making enough efforts for its users and I'll try to explain why. Of course, YYMV. ;-)

  • Debian packaging is made for developers, not users. Debian has too many packages. To take just one example, the OCaml compiler is packaged into the main compiler, its libraries, the native compiler and the byte code one, etc. Why so many packages? If I am an OCaml developer, I want all of them so why do I need to manually find (the naming is far from being obvious, at least for beginners) and install so many packages? I have heard of several reasons: it allows to factorise common parts between the different binary architectures, it allows to install the command line only parts without the graphics parts, it allows to install only what the user wants, etc. For me, those reasons are just plain wrong. We have more and more disk capacity on our machines so disk usage is no longer a limitation. The package should be able to dynamically activate the graphic parts automatically if the X server is available. And the factorisation of shared parts between Debian architectures should be done on the servers storing the packages, not trough the packaging system.
  • Debian has out-dated software. Debian Wheezy is about to be released and it will have GNOME 3.4. But GNOME 3.6 is already out and GNOME 3.8 is on its way. And I am taking GNOME as an example, it is the same issue for lot of software within Debian. I have heard this is for stability issues. But software packaged in Debian is already stable! It should take 10 or 15 days to integrate a new software into Debian stable, not months or even years (the time between successive stable releases). I acknowledge that some packages have complex interdependencies between each others. For example, when a new release of the OCaml compiler is out, one needs to recompile all OCaml packages. But this constraint is only for OCaml packages. Why should I wait for a new stable version of Debian to get the newly released OCaml compiler? For me this sounds just plain wrong.
  • Nobody uses plain Debian stable. Debian developers are using unstable. Debian users are using Debian stable, but enriched with backports because of out-dated software. Or derivatives like Ubuntu. The fact the Debian developers are not using what they recommend to users is bogus. I know they do that for technical reasons, but that should not be a good reason. Debian developers should use what they are providing to their users, except maybe for a few packages they are working on.
  • There are too many dependencies between packages. The dependency system of Debian is a nice piece of work, it was ahead of its time when it was created. But the use of dependencies has been perverted. The dependencies are manually computed (thus source of errors and bugs) and at the same time any software can write to about any part of the file system. Due to too many dependencies and lack of clean interfaces between sub-systems, the installation of a recent user software can trigger a ton of packages down to a new kernel or libc. Why is it so? I think the sub-systems of Debian (e.g. the X graphical infrastructure, the kernel and base C libraries, the OCaml system, ...) should be isolated the one from the others. It would allow them to be updated without waiting for the others. Having dependencies between 29,000 packages is just not scalable. It is even more true if those dependencies are manually computed.
  • Debian packaging is lacking automation. I am a developer. Debian packagers are developers. It always astonished me how much manual work should be done to make and maintain a Debian package. All developers know that if they want to be efficient, they need to automate their work as much as possible, so as to be able to focus their manpower on the complex parts. Everything should be automated in Debian packages, starting from a minimal description file. Automation should be the default (package creation, test, static analysis, ...), not the exception.
  • One cannot install simultaneously several versions of the same software. As a user or developer, I want to use the stable version of a piece of software and maybe the latest stable version that just have been released in order to do a few tests or check that my software still compiles with the new shiny compiler. Debian does not allow me to do that. And if I install a newer package, downgrading to the previous version is complex and error prone.
  • Debian is undocumented. I am not talking about the installation guide which is nice, I am talking about the modifications made to software by Debian developers. Doing modification on the "standard" (for the software) way of configuring or using it has always seemed suspect to me, even if I agree that having harmonized configuration is a real advantage (all configuration files in /etc for example). But all of those modifications should be documented in README.Debian file. To take an example, the last time I tried to install the dokuwiki Debian package, I was unable to configure it! The way to add new users had been changed compared to a regular dokuwiki (the web interface was disabled), and those changes were undocumented. It should be a release critical bug! Without proper documentation, the user cannot use the software. And, of course, the reason behind those changes should be questioned, even for security reasons (a very secure but unusable software is superfluous. Security is a trade-off).

So, why I am complaining? Why I do not become a Debian Developer, so I can fix it? Because a single developer is not going to change the root causes of those issues. They need a massive development effort, or at least a massive acknowledgement by the Debian Developers. And I don't have ready-made answers to those issues (even if I have some ideas to solve them).

Is the grass greener in the other fields? I don't think so, or at least I am not aware of it. I like Debian for is community approach, its focus on Free Software (even if it is sometimes imperfect) and the wide range of software packaged in it (the OCaml packages are numerous for example). I just hope that the whole Debian community will focus on more user related issues in the future.